xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"> Mountnessing Bridge Club

Mountnessing Bridge Club

 

 

Board 13: The 'flat' board that wasn't very 'flat'!

 

 

Hand played on 

14th December 2006

Board number 13

Red Section

Dealer

North

Vulnerability

Both

Submitted by

Alaric Cundy

 

 

 

North

AQT542

K

T953

  K8

 

 

 

 

West

KJ6

A4

KJ62

JT94

 

East

73

QT9753

Q7

A62

 

 

 

 

 

North

 

 

 

Bidding: 

 

East

 

 

 

 

 

South

 

 

 

 

 

West

 

 

South

98

J862

A84

Q753

 

 

1

2

 

No

End

 1NT

 

No  

   

 

 

For the second week running, Board 13 in the Red Section looked fairly uneventful...

 

East faced a slightly awkward choice of opening lead, and in practice plumped for the aggressive Queen of Diamonds, which was won in Dummy.  Declarer played the 9 of spades, which was covered by the Jack (else Declarer 'picks them all up'), and Queen.  So Declarer conceded one spade, one heart, two diamonds, and a club, for a net +110.  As the cards lie, Declarer has the opportunity to make a ninth trick, unless East is fully alert.  After winning the queen of trumps, lead the small club towards Dummy.  Unless East goes in with the Ace, a second entry to Dummy materialises for a second finesse in trumps.  On the other hand, the Defenders felt they may have missed out, because they had helped Declarer to establish a second trick in diamonds.  It sounded like a 'middling' sort of board...

 

In practice the traveller revealed a shared 'bottom' for NS with two other tables.  Two Declarers did find their ninth trick, but at three others EW got into the bidding with their hearts - expensive!  I can see how it happens...

 

At our table, East correctly passed the 1NT response.  A double from East in this position should be taken as a take-out double of 1 .  The problem is, though you just about have sufficient High Card Points for the bid, your partner will expect a better heart holding, and it's understandable how West could get carried away were you to double ...

 

The other potential route to disaster for EW is if East chooses to overcall 2.  Vulnerable?  It ought to be be better quality than that!  South doesn't really have a bid now, but West may well overestimate his / her values and land the pair into trouble.  West's best course of action is to pass - but that is unlikely!  The correct bid is 2 - the unassuming cue bid that asks about the quality of partner's overcall.  Now EW may come to rest in 3, but the obvious spade lead  causes problems: North cashes two winning spades, and leads a third, generating a trump promotion for South, and giving the defenders in total two spades, one natural trump plus the ruff and one in each minor.  Of course, if South finds a penalty double - which happened at one table - then it gets even worse!

 

As we all know, in Duplicate Bridge, very few 'flat boards' actually turn out to be 'flat'!