xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"> Mountnessing Bridge Club

Mountnessing Bridge Club

 

 

Board 13: What would you bid?

 

 

Hand played on 

22nd February 2007

Board number 13

Red Section

Dealer

North

Vulnerability

Both

Submitted by

Alaric Cundy

 

 

 

North

9762

T

73

AQJT82

 

 

 

 

West

AJ5

KJ

AK965

K64

 

East

T8

Q8654

J82

953

 

 

 

 

 

North

 

 

 

Bidding: 

 

East

 

 

 

 

 

South

 

 

 

 

 

West

 

 

South

KQ43

A9732

QT4

7

 

 

No

End

No

1

x

 

 

East faced a worrying moment when West's take-out double was passed to him, but really there was no alternative to pass.  Both North and South thought about bidding 1, but were put off because West's double meant it was very likely that he held a four card spade suit.  North passed hoping that East would take it out.  So South finished up as Declarer in the unusual contract of 1 doubled.

 

Declarer looks to be horribly short of tricks, but West has awkward leads to find.  At the table, West started with the King of diamonds, to which partner signalled a three-card holding.  West tried the King of trumps at trick 2 and that was allowed to hold.  West continued with the Ace and a small diamond, to give Declarer her first trick.  South tried the King of spades, taken by West, who continued with the Jack of trumps, which was taken by the Ace.  South crossed to the Ace of Clubs, and led a small spade from table, expecting to find a 4-1 break, but the queen held the trick.  Declarer exited with a third spade, taken by West, who exited with a diamond, which South ruffed cheaply, as East discarded a club.  By now, the defenders had accumulated 2 spade tricks, one trump, and two diamonds, and Declarer could not prevent East from making two trumps, so she finished one light, conceding the dreaded pairs score of -200.  

 

Can NS do any better?  Playing double-dummy, South could have taken the club finesse, but she judged that East must hold the King in order to be able to pass out 1 doubled.  Had she taken the finesse, South would have won one spade, one diamond, two clubs, and would need to make three trumps for the contract, one of which is obviously the Ace.  She can ruff the third club cheaply for the second trump trick, and should subsequently come to a third trump trick as she holds the 9 and 7 behind East's queen and 8.  That line is very risky, as East is likely to hold the King of clubs, and now the contract would fail by two tricks - doubled and vulnerable...

 

Obviously, NS would do better if either of them had the courage to bid 1, especially if Declarer is allowed to make the diamond trick.  The ace of clubs plus two club ruffs, the Ace of hearts plus a heart ruff, the diamond, and one natural trump trick adds up to enough for 1.  In any event, West may well bid 1NT if the bidding comes back to him (showing about 19 - 20 HCPs after the original double).  West ought to be able to amass 7 tricks in total, including 4 diamonds, two spades, and at least one heart or a club in the wash.

 

I don't think that anyone can be faulted for the bidding or play - but it was East/West who finished up smiling, perhaps rather fortuitously.